CBP Continues to Make a Positive Impact in the Communities They Live in


“A baby boy was safely delivered at the Port of Brownsville last week, thanks to the lifesaving skills of #CBP Officer Justin Dina, who used his previous training as a Paramedic to unwrap the umbilical cord from around the newborn’s neck. Mom and Baby are doing well!”


Service to community above and beyond the call of duty.

#itswhatwedo #BPAFN #serviceaboveall #ConnectingThoseThatProtectUs
Department of Homeland Security #Customs  

 

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Local Border Patrol agent creates Veterans Support Program

Local Border Patrol agent creates Veterans Support Program

New veterans support program

LAREDO, Texas (KGNS) – With veterans making up a third of the Border Patrol’s population, it has become imperative to provide services to those CBP veterans who are in need of help.

Border Patrol agent Joshua Guell served five tours in Iraq and Afghanistan before joining the agency.

Guell realized that he needed help, but he did not know how to go about receiving it.

As a result, the Border Patrol agent decided to create a special veterans assistance program at the Laredo Sector.

Since starting the program back in March of 2017, the Veterans Support Program has been able to take care of over 1,500 veteran related issues; helping to put agents at ease both in the field and at home.

Guell says, “The Veterans are starting to see that positive effect that it’s starting to have on the service, on their lives, through receiving their benefits, through starting to receive some of the care that they have been putting off because they didn’t know where to go.”

If you or any veteran knows of someone who is in need of help and support, do not be afraid to reach out.

Ceremony celebrates bond between Laredo and Sister City



The ceremony’s speaker this year, CBP Acting Commissioner Kevin K. McAleenan, pointed out that this show of international respect and friendship between young people signifies a hope for the future.

“These young people lead us by our example. They reflect the optimism of youth. They represent our confidence that we will remain close as nations. And their youth reminds us of what’s at stake as we look to the future together, and the importance of carrying on these traditions of good neighbors for many decades and generations to come,” McAleenan said.

Border Patrol chief makes hiring pitch at College of the Ozarks

Ronald Vitiello heard about College of the Ozarks’ motto — it’s “Hard Work U.”

So, the acting deputy commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection stopped by Monday night to see if he could entice a few students into a career with the federal agencies.

He needs about 5,000 people.

“Customs and Border Patrol is hiring,” Vitiello told a packed crowd at Jones Learning Center auditorium. “We want people who will help protect our borders from bad things and bad people.

Under orders from the president, Vitiello said, he is hiring 5,000 people to shore up border protection, particularly along the U.S.-Mexico border.

In an interview after his talk, Vitiello said a new Border Patrol agent can expect to start his or her career with a base salary in the low $40,000 range, and by the fifth year could be making close to $100,000 with overtime and other perks.

Career agents can qualify for a government pension, a savings plan similar to a 401(k) and still qualify for Social Security.

Wyatt Saltarelli, 21, a senior in C of O’s Criminal Justice program, liked what he heard.

“By being one of the world’s best law enforcement agencies, I am definitely considering a career with the border patrol,” he said. “I come from a law enforcement background. My dad was a police officer. I’m from Houston, Texas, so I think I would want to work the Mexico border. I like the idea of serving and protecting our country from any outside threat.”

Vitiello said on any given day, Customs and Border Patrol agents might screen 78,000 trucks, looking for drugs, human trafficking or counterfeit merchandise.

Ground, water and air patrols look for people trying to enter the country illegally and often make life-saving rescues of people trying to cross deserts or rivers, or free those who are shipped in aboard locked semi trucks.

They also look for pests coming into the United States aboard fruit and vegetables.

“All of the fresh produce that’s not grown in the U.S., we inspect it before it moves through,” Vitiello said.

Agents often encounter the strangest things.

“In one suitcase, our agents found hundreds of live snakes being smuggled into the country,” he said.

The Chicago-O’Hare U.S. Post Office handles 400,000 boxes and packages a day, and all go through some form of inspection.

“In an hour and a half while I was there, we saw eight seizures of contraband material,” Vitiello said.

While border security and illegal immigration are major campaign issues for the president, Vitiello said the movement of opioid drugs into the country by foreign drug cartels continues to be a major problem.

“The opioid thing is not uncontrollable, but it’s daunting,” Vitiello said.

In 2013, for example, agents intercepted 2 pounds of the powerful and potentially lethal painkiller fentanyl. Last year, border agents confiscated 1,500 pounds of the substance.

E-commerce has made it far easier for people to order drugs and have them delivered to their doorstep in a matter of days, he said. That’s one of the reasons why Customs and Border Protection is ramping up its hiring.

They also fly nine unarmed Predator drones equipped with cameras and radar to identify and intercept potential terrorists and illegal cross-border activity.

Vitiello said there are job opportunities across all aspects of Customs and Border Protection, including staff support roles, not just front-line agents.

He said all Customs and Border Protection job candidates go through a deep vetting process, which includes a detailed background check and a polygraph test to verify what they have said about themselves is true.

He encouraged anyone who might be interested in a career with Customs or Border Patrol to explore https://www.cbp.gov/careers.

About the U.S. Border Patrol

The United States Border Patrol is the mobile, uniformed law enforcement arm of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection within the Department of Homeland Security responsible for securing U.S. borders between ports of entry. The priority mission of the Border Patrol is preventing terrorists and terrorists’ weapons, including weapons of mass destruction, from entering the United States.

While the Border Patrol has changed dramatically since its inception in 1924, its primary mission remains unchanged: to detect and prevent the illegal entry of aliens into the United States. Together with other law enforcement officers, the Border Patrol helps maintain borders that work — facilitating the flow of legal immigration and goods while preventing the illegal trafficking of people and contraband.

ts and terrorists’ weapons, including weapons of mass destruction, from entering the United States.

While the Border Patrol has changed dramatically since its inception in 1924, its primary mission remains unchanged: to detect and prevent the illegal entry of aliens into the United States. Together with other law enforcement officers, the Border Patrol helps maintain borders that work — facilitating the flow of legal immigration and goods while preventing the illegal trafficking of people and contraband.

BP Agents Land on Highway to Render Aid

TUCSON, Ariz. – Border Patrol agents assigned to Tucson Sector Mobile Response Team responded to a multiple-vehicle accident on State Route 86 January 30, near Sells to provide emergency medical treatment for an injured motorcyclist.

During joint operations with Army National Guard, crew members observed an accident involving two vehicles and a motorcycle. The helicopter pilot immediately landed on the road to allow the MRT agents onboard, trained emergency medical technicians, to provide medical assistance.

Agents treated the male cyclist until emergency medical services arrived to transport him to a nearby hospital.

MRT was established to provide the U.S. Border Patrol with a rapidly deployable assets capable of addressing problematic areas along the nation’s borders. MRT maintains a cadre of agents certified as EMTs and paramedics.

Department of Defense routinely deploys units and assets to support law enforcement agencies. These units often serve as force multipliers by offering support with surveillance and reconnaissance efforts to detect, identify, and classify targets of interest which contributes to a more secure border.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials welcome assistance from the community. Citizens can report suspicious activity to the Border Patrol and remain anonymous by calling 1-877-872-7435 toll free.